Discussion:
Cancer, Tigers and SSP
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Todd
2004-01-21 08:19:06 UTC
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Ever wonder how many of the small number of zoo animals carry genes
for cancers, kidney failure, etc.?

Zoo tiger patriarch dying Calgary - One of the Calgary Zoo's oldest
tigers is dying of bone cancer.

Fifteen-year-old Khasam, who has sired many of the zoo's Siberian
tiger family, is only expected to live another week or so. The tumor
is visible as a painful swelling on his right front leg, and he limps.

His vet, Sandie Black, says there is nothing they can do.

"Unfortunately, there's no treatment for the form of cancer Khasam
has. There's nothing we can offer that can stop or slow down the
progression of this cancer, and so what we're offering is palliative
care," Black said. "It's a very personal decision for everyone, when
Khasam's had enough.

"I think at this point, we're talking days to weeks."

Black says because Khasam was born in the wild, his DNA is important
to broaden the small gene pool of Siberian tigers born in captivity.
Vets will harvest his semen before he dies.

Khasam came to the zoo in 1991, after wandering too close to a
Siberian village.

http://calgary.cbc.ca/regional/servlet/View?filename=ca_tiger20040116
John
2004-01-28 21:44:22 UTC
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Post by Todd
Ever wonder how many of the small number of zoo animals carry genes
for cancers, kidney failure, etc.?
In Zoos probably a lot more than in the wild because of any
inbreeding. I also think cancer in any mammal has a lot to do with
the environment they live, and their diet.

In the wild Tigers will be able to hunt, kill and eat the prey that
they are supposed to eat. In captivity, if they are halfway around
the planet in a Zoo, they wont get the same food as they would in
their natural habitat. They might be fed carcasses of dead farm
animals that have been living and feeding in fields sprayed with
pesticides etc.

Perhaps it also has something to do with the water they drink as well.
I mean the Siberian Tiger (in fact any Tiger) might get to drink purer
more natural water in it's natural habitat that's full of nutrients
and minerals etc, whereas in captivity it might be drinking tap water
full of crap.

I think the main thing with cancer is that it's a disease and as such
there isn't really a cure for it. You might only ever be able to eat
the right foods and drink the right water as a means of preventing it,
as well as living in the right environment and breathing the right
kind of air.

John

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